Vintage Military Firearms

Discussion in 'General Firearm Forum' started by SHOOTER13, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    This thread is dedicated to the discussion of vintage military firearms...old World War and Police Action veterans as well as ComBloc survivors of the Cold War.

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    The M1 Garand (officially designated as United States Rifle, Caliber .30, M1), was the first semi automatic to be generally issued to the infantry of any nation. Called "the greatest battle implement ever devised" by General George S. Patton, the Garand officially replaced the bolt action M1903 Springfield as the standard service rifle of the United States Armed Forces in 1936 and was subsequently replaced by the selective fire M14 in 1957.

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    Pictured above is my Springfield Armory M1 Garand...manufactured in November 1944. She is pictured with an original M1942 16" bayonet ( very rare...most were cut down to 10" ) and a repo M7 fragmentation grenade launcher.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2012
  2. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    Pictured below is my P38 built by Spreewerke GmbH, Metallwarenfabrik, in Berlin/Spandau Germany in 1942 during the second World War. The Spreewerke inspection stamp consisted of an eagle above the number 88 (E/88), but the first 500 weapons made at the Spreewerke factory had Walther inspection stamps which consisted of an eagle over 359 (E/359) . (My specimen has a serial number of 246 and the Walther acceptance stamp E/359). The letters CYQ are the code used to designate construction at the Spreewerke plant, which produced around 285,000 units by the wars end. This specimen is also Wehrmacht stamped with an Nazi eagle over swaztika. The P38 is chambered for 9mm Parabellum and holds 8 rounds in the magazine. She also came with a black semi-hard leather holster that holds an extra magazine.

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  3. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    The Pistol Makarov (PM) is a medium-size, straight blowback action, frame-fixed barrel handgun. In blowback designs, the only force holding the slide closed is that of the recoil spring; upon firing, the barrel and slide do not have to unlock, as do locked-breech design pistols. Blowback designs are simple and more accurate than designs using a recoiling, tilting, or articulated barrel, but they are limited practically by the weight of the slide. The 9x18mm cartridge is a practical cartridge in blowback-operated pistols; producing a respectable level of energy from a gun of moderate weight and size. The PM is heavy for its size by modern US commercial handgun standards, largely because in a blowback pistol the heavy slide provides greater inertia to delay opening of the breech until internal pressures have fallen to a safe level. Other, more powerful cartridges have been used in blowback pistol designs, but the Makarov is widely regarded as particularly well balanced in its design elements.

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    Pictured above is my Cold War relic from the year 1961...an East German Makarov chambered in 9x18mm. She actually shoots pretty good for an old timer...
     
  4. stanger1944

    stanger1944 Well-Known Member

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    Thinking of getting a Yugo Tokerev I believe it is. I have not made up my mind yet though.
     
  5. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    I hear that they are pretty good shooters...
     
  6. Pancho_Villa

    Pancho_Villa Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Here is an odd one for ya. Got it off a guy coming in the front door of a local gun show. The so called "Tanker" model Enfield No.2 MKI* British revolver. Story on these is that the British tank crews requested the guns have no hammer spurs to avoid hanging up on things. This one is pretty early, mid 30s. Think they started converting Webleys with spur hammers to this bob hammer type in 1938. This gun is blue. IIRC the wartime finsh guns started around 1942. those had black paint for a finish that wore off quickly. The guns were suppose to be DA only or SA/DA Webleys converted to DA only. Hammers had no spur to manually c0ck guns. Caliber is .38/200 British. a .200 gr. .38 cal cartridge that is much the same as the U.S. .38 S&W cartridge. Six shots, 5" barrel, Fixed sights, DA only, catch on left side breaks open the revolver to ekect, plastic grips, lanyard ring on this one was removed by owner and he lost it. DUMBAZZ.

    Bore was nice and sharp, locked up tight. Only fired 4 rounds of the expensive .38 S&W, Winch Super X, 148 gr. RN through it. Slow deliberate fire at 10 yds. Gun was mostly to look at and not shoot much.

    http://s100.photobucket.com/albums/m3/PanchoVilla_2/?action=view&current=001-4.jpg#!oZZ18QQcurrentZZhttp%3A%2F%2Fs100.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fm3%2FPanchoVilla_2%2F%3Faction%3Dview%26current%3D007-5.jpg

    Found a better pic of it.

    http://s100.photobucket.com/albums/.../PanchoVilla_2/?action=view&current=005-2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2012
  7. Pancho_Villa

    Pancho_Villa Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Do these count as old military? Well, don't know if this one was ever really used in a war? But still, it is old and military. But it is also a clone of an H&K 91. Actually a G3 military kit on a Fed Arms receiver. .308 cal, 20 round mags, this one is semi only, adjustable sights, generic receiver has a rail/bases on it for a U.S. Weaver type ring setup. Easy to put a scope onit. Shoots pretty well, for a beater at 1.5 MOA with cheap Wolf steel case. Guess a better trigger would help.

    If it don't fit here, guess you can move it.

    http://s100.photobucket.com/albums/.../PanchoVilla_2/?action=view&current=001-4.jpg
     
  8. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    Both firearms you posted fit the catagory...thanks for showin' 'em !!
     
  9. opaww

    opaww Banned

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    My Cetme which is the forerunner of the H&KG3/91
     

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  10. Pancho_Villa

    Pancho_Villa Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Nice Cetme ya got opaww. The guns are all pretty much the same. I was tempted to buy one when the AWB expired, just never got around to it. The FA 91 just turned up at a show at the right time.
     
  11. opaww

    opaww Banned

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    I know it is a good shooter and hits where its pointed at
     
  12. Mitchell

    Mitchell Junior Member

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    My mom ordered this 8mm Gewehr 98 sporteristed 1917 Mauser from Sears for my birthday when I was very young. We didn't have much money, but I wanted a deer rifle real bad and the sporterized version of this in the catalog looked to my young eyes like the gun that could do it all. I wish now I had gotten the original military version they offered, but what do kids know. A few years later I recut and refinished the stock to a more modern look, but it is the same original wooden stock.
     

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    Last edited: Oct 28, 2012
  13. Mitchell

    Mitchell Junior Member

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    My dadtraded for this Smith & Wesson just before I was born and I inherited itafter he died when I was 11. I found outthat it was manufactured in 1916 and shipped/sold to the British military as a sidearmto be used in WW1. It was shipped bluedcaliber .455 Mark II Hand Ejector Second Model. Somehow it got back to the states and changed to .45 auto-rim/.45 ACP andnickel plated. I often heard my dad (aWWII Marine Sargent) say he wanted bone grips for this, but he never got them. Ifinally added these imitation bone grips a few years ago for him.
     

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  14. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    That is an awesome piece of history...personal and S&W !!

    You know Dad is smiling...
     
  15. blackwolffcf

    blackwolffcf Well-Known Member

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    You have no idea how much i envy you right now…. :eek::eek::eek:
     
  16. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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  17. levelcross

    levelcross Well-Known Member

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    So much envy being felt right now. One day I hope that my collection will have something worthy of this thread. As for now just a Gen 1 and Gen 2 Glock LEO issue.
     
  18. hotshott

    hotshott The "Bass-Tard" Son

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    Shooter. What year did the design of the bayonet change ? My Mosin Nagant has a 3blade style and my Zastava has a double side dagger style. I do know the reason was due to the gaping wound left by the tri blade.
     
  19. hotshott

    hotshott The "Bass-Tard" Son

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    Very nice Garand. My father has the Walther version of that p38 in 9mm para. Took me a lot of shooting with the Garand to finally hit a target at max yardage. 800 or more.
     
  20. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    Reply to hotshott...



    Before 1943, the M1 Garand and all variants of the 1903 Springfield were using the M1905 and later M1942 bayonets.

    In 1943, the U.S. Army decided a shorter bayonet would be better, so as many of the M1905/1942s as possible were recalled, had their blades cut down to 10 inches, and were reissued. These shortened bayonets, along with the newly made 10-inch bayonets, are called M1 bayonets. They functioned well in the European theater, where in the rare bayonet-actions of the time, they were matched up against the 9¾ inch long blade of the German S84/98 III bayonet fitted on the K98k. However, in the Pacific theater, the much longer Japanese Type30 bayonets on the already very long Arisaka rifle caused many American troops to retain the longer M1905 / M1942 bayonets.