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I have my Bersa Thunder 380 Duo-Tone, and while wearing it today OWB I noticed that the "beavertail" has some areas that are somewhat sharp edged. I was wondering if there is a finish of some sort on these frames that would be damaged if I was to try to polish it a little smoother.
 

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Atomic Chicken
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I have my Bersa Thunder 380 Duo-Tone, and while wearing it today OWB I noticed that the "beavertail" has some areas that are somewhat sharp edged. I was wondering if there is a finish of some sort on these frames that would be damaged if I was to try to polish it a little smoother.
IIRC, the frame is anodized aluminum. The anodizing gives it a very hard surface, but it's a very thin hardness. Any attempt at smoothing edges or surfaces will more than likely remove the anodizing. This won't affect reliability or longevity on an area like the beaver tail, but attempting to modify other areas, like the feed ramp, likely will result in causing problems at some point.
 

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I have my Bersa Thunder 380 Duo-Tone, and while wearing it today OWB I noticed that the "beavertail" has some areas that are somewhat sharp edged. I was wondering if there is a finish of some sort on these frames that would be damaged if I was to try to polish it a little smoother.
Glad I checked first. i was about to post a comment almost exactly as yours because the first time I shot my BT380 matte/gold finish I ended up cut by these sharp edges on th beavertail. I didn't care much at first, but days later I did notice it because it was hurting and a scab was forming. it took 3 weeks to heal and completely dissappear. When I used the gun again, I did notice that these edges are really sharp and the wound opened again, so I had to use gloves. Anyone knows if a Walther PPK has these edges on the beavertail? I did think about smoothing these out, but I don't want to damaged the gun.
 

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Atomic Chicken
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Glad I checked first. i was about to post a comment almost exactly as yours because the first time I shot my BT380 matte/gold finish I ended up cut by these sharp edges on th beavertail. I didn't care much at first, but days later I did notice it because it was hurting and a scab was forming. it took 3 weeks to heal and completely dissappear. When I used the gun again, I did notice that these edges are really sharp and the wound opened again, so I had to use gloves. Anyone knows if a Walther PPK has these edges on the beavertail? I did think about smoothing these out, but I don't want to damaged the gun.
Okay, let's go over this one more time, just to be clear.
IIRC, the frame is anodized aluminum. The anodizing gives it a very hard surface, but it's a very thin hardness. Any attempt at smoothing edges or surfaces will more than likely remove the anodizing. This won't affect reliability or longevity on an area like the beaver tail, but attempting to modify other areas, like the feed ramp, likely will result in causing problems at some point.
If the beavertail is chewing up your thumb web, I see no reason other than cosmetic why you shouldn't work them over a little to smooth the sharp edges. I say "cosmetic" because I'm not sure about your "matte/gold" finish. If the frame is anodized to a gold color, then removing the sharp edges would leave the underlying plain aluminum showing, which could be regarded as unsightly, but it won't harm the utility or longevity of the gun. BTW, I smoothed the beavertail on mine, a standard two-tone. It seems to be a common complaint.
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that anodizing also added a layer of corrosion resistant oxide to aluminum. Stiping this away could lead to corrosion. I know that people think of Al as a weather-proof metal, but it does "rust" if improperly cared for.
 

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Atomic Chicken
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that anodizing also added a layer of corrosion resistant oxide to aluminum. Stiping this away could lead to corrosion. I know that people think of Al as a weather-proof metal, but it does "rust" if improperly cared for.
First let me point out that I am not a metallurgist nor have I ever played one on TV, though I did stay at a Holiday Inn once.

Yes, bare aluminum will oxidize, but IIRC that very surface oxidation goes a long way in hindering deeper penetration. Unless you regularly leave your gun out in the rain I doubt that oxidation will be a problem. I eased the beavertail edges on my Bersa several years ago and there has been no noticeable oxidation since. It looks now just like it did right after I worked on it. But then, I live in a dry climate so that may affect my result.
 
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